LED Downlights

LED Downlights

LED Downlights

(Showing 6 categories)

LED Downlight Modules

LED downlight modules screw into your existing fixtures with little to no modification depending on the fixture and base type. In the video below, we show you how to install one into a traditional downlight fixture with an Edison base using the socket adapter included with the downlight. This gets rid of unsightly gaps and airflow that wastes energy and increases energy costs. For new construction, consider IC-rated downlights, which include the housing, trim, and LED. Unlike Non-IC rated downlights, which are primarily used in remodels, IC-rated downlights have additional heat distribution properties that allows the module to sit flush against ceiling insulation.

Important Factors When Buying LED Downlights


4-inch and 6-inch downlights are the most common sizes found in residential homes. The 8-inch and larger modules are more likely to be used in commercial lighting, so measure the hole or your existing fixture before making your purchase if you’re replacing an existing light or fixture. Surface mount downlights can either be installed with a J-box as a flush mount, where the fixture is visible on the ceiling or installed in a larger size recessed housing. For example, a 4-inch surface mount downlight fits most 4-inch J-boxes or can be installed in standard 5 to 6-inch recessed housings. Unlike can lights, the trim on these LED downlights allow the module to sit flush against the hole, meaning less cool air escapes. LEDs also produce less heat than incandescents or CFLs, reducing your cooling cost as an added benefit to the already energy efficient product.


After you know which size you need, consider the location and what the space will be used for. In spaces where you want more light, look for a lumen light fixture. A higher wattage will usually give off more lumens, but within the same wattage there can be some variation. We’ve divided the products out by Watt equivalent. A 75 Watt equal LED downlight is comparable in light output to a 75 Watt incandescent. Thinking about how the space is utilized will help you pick color temperature. Lower Kelvin light bulbs are warmer, giving off a yellow glow similar to incandescents or the glow from a fireplace. Higher Kelvin bulbs are a stark white or blue. This light is better for concentration, reading, and task lighting.