Clear Christmas Lights

Clear Christmas Lights

(Showing 4 categories)


History of Christmas Lights

The first Christmas light string was put together by Edward H. Johnson. He used 80 red, white, and blue light bulbs to decorate his Christmas tree in 1882. The trend of replacing candles with Christmas lights didn't take off until after 1895 when President Grover Cleveland decorated the White House tree with 100 multi-colored bulbs. While most of us save the C7 and C9 bulbs for outlining the house or larger outdoor displays, mini Christmas lights weren't invented until the 1970s. Despite the colorful start, clear and white Christmas lights have become a favorite, making up over half of the market in some regions. These clear Christmas lights are especially popular with city parks and businesses in close proximity such as strip malls because of the color consistency across the display.

Our clear Christmas mini lights come in a variety of wire colors including white, green, brown, and black to make it easier to blend the wire in with fences, foliage, snow, or tree bark. Wrap the lights around columns to bring some magic to your restaurant patio or drape mini string lights from the rafters. Use tree wrap lights to save yourself from going in circles around the front yard trees. For trees with larger than a 2 ft. circumference, you could either wrap these string lights around the trunk or use two tree wraps and twist ties. All of our clear Christmas lights are UL rated for outdoor locations. If the lights are going to be left outside during extended periods below freezing, consider LED Christmas lights, which are less affected by cold than incandescent strings.

How Many Strings Can I Connect?

The number of sets you can connect is determined by the length of the string, number of bulbs, and maximum wattage rating of the string. To save you the headache of math (because who wants to do that during the holidays) we've listed the maximum number of connections for each product. This only works if you're connecting two of the same length or shorter. To maximize your run-length for large installations, consider LED mini lights. Since they draw less power, you can use more bulbs on a string and make longer connections. LED strings also last longer so they need to be replaced less frequently.

When putting up your Christmas lights, only connect incandescent strings to incandescent strings or LED string lights with other LED strings. The incandescent mini lights draw more electricity than the LED strings. If connected, the incandescent string will overload the LED string, causing the bulbs to overheat and fail prematurely. When stacking plugs or putting multiple strings on a single circuit, make sure the circuit can handle the entire load so that you don't find yourself using a flash light to search for your fuse box.